Illustrated Brewday: A Simple Overview of a BIAB Brewday

This is a general overview of how most my brewdays go.

Step 1

I start by collecting all the water into a single kettle. I also measure out and add any brewing salts and acid. Then I hit the heat and set my temp for my strike water.

Step 2

While my water is heating I like to go weigh out and grind all my grain for the brew.

Step 3

Once my water is up to strike temp, I add my brewing bag and mash in. Then I check my temp and adjust if needed. At this point, I make sure that my electric kettle is off to avoid scorching my bag and grain.

Step 4

Once I’ve mashed in, I take advantage of the mash rest to weigh out my hops.

Step 5

15 minutes into my mash and time to check my pH and temperature.

Step 6

After the mash is done (generally 45-60 minutes), I pull my bag and let it drain on a spare oven rack. I then check the mash temp for a final time.

Check gravity (don’t forget!)

Step 7

Boil. My boil length is usually 60 minutes. I add hops per the recipe.

Step 8

During the boil I sanitize all the stuff I’ll need post boil. I use the scissors when I need to cut open whirlpool hop packs or am using dry yeast. Generally, all my gear is clean before I start by brewday so I can sanitize it directly.

Step 9

Time to chill. I start with a gentle stirring motion and after the temp has dropped a bit I get really aggressive with the immersion chiller moving it up and down like a crazy man. This has two benefits, maybe three. One is adding oxygen to the wort and the second is I get things chilled very quickly. As for the third, I can’t speak to all the science behind it but I’m afraid that if I go crazy with the immersion chiller right from the go I’ll be introducing some hot-side oxidation. Once things are at pitching temp, I transfer to the ferementor and pitch the yeast.

Check gravity!

Step 10

Nexy I place the fermentor in a temp controlled environment. I use an electric blanket and chest freezer with my temp controller probe insulated and on the side of my fermentor.

That’s it. Now is time to clean up and have a beer!

Brewing Stuff I Use

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